The Last of the Nazi Hunters

Nazi war criminals who fled Germany at the end of World War II are dying of old age and so are the men and women who hunted them across the generations. Former Newsweek foreign correspondent Andrew Nagorski says their full stories can now be told for the first time. His new book, The Nazi Hunters is an account of post-war justice after the Holocaust.

Public Eye Interview with Andrew Nagorski on The Nazi Hunters

After the Nuremberg trials and the start of the Cold War, most of the victors in World War II lost interest in prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Many of the lower-ranking perpetrators quickly blended in with the millions who were seeking to rebuild their lives in a new Europe, while those who felt most at risk fled the continent. In his new book,The Nazi Hunters author Andrew Nagorski focuses on the small band of men and women who refused to allow their crimes to be forgotten—and who were determined to track them down to the furthest corners of the globe.

Justice, Not Vengeance

A journalist examines the Holocaust’s inhuman perpetrators and their all-too-human pursuers.

In 2004, French president Jacques Chirac journeyed to an obscure mountain village. Le Chambon-sur-Lignon was one of a handful of French towns to hide its Jewish residents during the Nazi occupation, and he had come to pay his respects six decades later. “Here, in adversity,” Chirac intoned, “the soul of the French nation manifested itself. Here was the embodiment of our country’s conscience.”

The Nazi hunters who wouldn’t give up: “Many war criminals… simply went back and resumed their lives”

Detailed, dramatic, and at times gripping, Andrew Nagorski’s “The Nazi Hunters” looks at about a dozen men and women who kept pushing at a time when the world was trying to move on. Hunters like Simon Wiesenthal and Serge and Ben Klarsfeld are characters here, as are Gestapo chief Klaus Barbie, Auschwitz commandant Rudolf Hoess, “Angel of Death” Josef Mengele, “Bitch of Buchenwald” Ilse Koch, and the notorious Holocaust mastermind Adolf Eichmann.

The Nazi hunters who wouldn’t give up: “Many war criminals… simply went back and resumed their lives”

Detailed, dramatic, and at times gripping, Andrew Nagorski’s “The Nazi Hunters” looks at about a dozen men and women who kept pushing at a time when the world was trying to move on. Hunters like Simon Wiesenthal and Serge and Ben Klarsfeld are characters here, as are Gestapo chief Klaus Barbie, Auschwitz commandant Rudolf Hoess, “Angel of Death” Josef Mengele, “Bitch of Buchenwald” Ilse Koch, and the notorious Holocaust mastermind Adolf Eichmann.

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