Holiday Recommendations from the Wall Street Journal for the Best History Books 

Andrew Nagorski’s engrossing “The Nazi Hunters” (Simon & Schuster, 393 pages, $30) is the story of the men and women—very different and often at odds with one another—who after 1945 pursued the architects and the executors of the Holocaust. At first they were spurred by a simple thirst for revenge, but their campaign evolved into a quest to make sure one of history’s greatest enormities would never be forgotten—in a holiday season or any other.

Book review: Tireless pursuit to bring Nazi criminals to justice

The sentencing in Germany this year of a 94-year-old former SS guard at the concentration camp at Auschwitz, Poland, and the death in July of Auschwitz survivor and chronicler Elie Wiesel make publication of this book exceptionally timely.

Book review: Tireless pursuit to bring Nazi criminals to justice

The sentencing in Germany this year of a 94-year-old former SS guard at the concentration camp at Auschwitz, Poland, and the death in July of Auschwitz survivor and chronicler Elie Wiesel make publication of this book exceptionally timely.

The Nazi Hunters exchange, part 2: ‘Individual dissent in the fight for justice is always needed’

The last former Nazis are dying out, and so, too, are those whose life’s work was to hunt them down. Nagorski tells their stories evenhandedly, uncovering a fascinating cast of characters from all over the world and placing their efforts in a broader perspective. He describes how Nazi hunters first aimed to exact revenge without trials, how early court cases were exploited to present dubious hearsay that convicted former Nazis in the court of public opinion, and how Germany and other countries eventually lost interest in prosecuting former Nazis.

Andrzej Wajda: The Filmmaker Who Tore Open the Iron Curtain

In the fall of 1968, when I was a newly arrived exchange student in Poland, I went to a screening of Andrzej Wajda’s “Ashes and Diamonds” in my dormitory at the university in Krakow. This was shortly after Warsaw Pact tanks had crushed the Prague Spring, Czechoslovakia’s attempt to experiment with “socialism with a human face,” and the brutal suppression of Polish student protests a few months earlier. The Iron Curtain of the Soviet Empire was drawing closed once again.

Joseph Harmatz, Holocaust ‘avenger’ who plotted reprisal against Nazi POWs, dies at 91

Joseph Harmatz, a Lithuanian Holocaust survivor who led a band of self-proclaimed “avengers” in poisoning 3,000 loaves of bread for German prisoners after World War II, an act that he regarded as rightful retribution for the Nazi slaughter of 6 million Jews, died Sept. 22 at his home in Tel Aviv. He was 91.

The cause was a heart ailment, said a son, Ronel Harmatz.

Authors in the Park

This October, bestselling authors and screenwriters from across the nation will gather in Winter Park for the first annual Authors in the Park book festival.

Mary Gail Coffee of the Winter Park Public Library said that the Authors in the Park book festival will celebrate Orlando’s love of literature on Oct. 1 at the library. Sponsored by the library, the Jewish Book Council and Writer’s Block Bookstore, the festival will consist of panel discussions, Q-and-A sessions and book signings from both local and nationally-acclaimed authors from a variety of genres.

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