News

May 20, 2016

BY FREDERICK TAYLOR

Between 1618 and 1648, millions of civilians died from violence, famine and pestilence as armies ranged across Central Europe in a savage conflict about power and religion. When the treaty was signed that ended the...

May 19, 2016

Following the end of World War II, the U.S. and its European allies pivoted immediately to a new mission: to stop the spread of Soviet Communism. The Cold War had begun, Nazis who would have been tried as war criminals suddenly became key resources in the fight against the communists, and the...

May 11, 2016

Andrew Nagorski, author of 2012’s Hitlerland, digs into the end of an era in The Nazi Hunters, a historical biography that chronicles the best-known and lesser-known hunters and their hunted more than 70 years after the end of World War II and the closing of Auschwitz and the...

May 10, 2016

There is a Zelig-like quality to Andrew Nagorski’s “The Nazi Hunters.” More often than not, in a saga spanning decades and continents, Nagorski has been there, interviewing the men and women pursuing the worst villains of the Holocaust.

Many of the stories he recounts, from the long-...

May 10, 2016

What Nazi Hunters Reveal About the Way We See History

Lily Rothman, Time

A new book goes inside a chapter of history that's about to end

As trials of former Nazis wend their way through the German legal system, ...

May 10, 2016

After the Nuremberg trials concluded and the Cold War began, most of the victors in World War II turned their attention elsewhere, too preoccupied to finish prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Lower-ranking Nazi officials blended in with the rest of Europe as people across the continent embarked...

May 06, 2016

Andrew Nagorski’s The Nazi Hunters comes at a significant point, at the juncture between living memory and the historical record. Death, rather than the courts, now claims the last Nazi criminals — as well as those who labored for decades to bring them to justice.

Nagorski has...

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