News

June 02, 2016

Criminals are never beyond the law – but how far should we go in persecuting Nazi officers, guards and soldiers 71 years after the end of World War II?

Nagorski's book energetically tells some of the most famous stories of the quest to push against that historical complacency. It...

May 21, 2016

Detailed, dramatic, and at times gripping, Andrew Nagorski’s “The Nazi Hunters” looks at about a dozen men and women who kept pushing at a time when the world was trying to move on. Hunters like Simon Wiesenthal and Serge and Ben Klarsfeld are characters here, as are Gestapo chief Klaus Barbie,...

May 20, 2016

Ten top-ranking Nazis were sent to the gallows in 1946 by the international war crimes tribunal in Nuremberg. Many more escaped justice for decades or forever, some by taking their own lives, some by going into hiding and some merely because all but a few dedicated avengers lost interest in them...

May 20, 2016

BY FREDERICK TAYLOR

Between 1618 and 1648, millions of civilians died from violence, famine and pestilence as armies ranged across Central Europe in a savage conflict about power and religion. When the treaty was signed that ended the...

May 19, 2016

Following the end of World War II, the U.S. and its European allies pivoted immediately to a new mission: to stop the spread of Soviet Communism. The Cold War had begun, Nazis who would have been tried as war criminals suddenly became key resources in the fight against the communists, and the...

May 11, 2016

Andrew Nagorski, author of 2012’s Hitlerland, digs into the end of an era in The Nazi Hunters, a historical biography that chronicles the best-known and lesser-known hunters and their hunted more than 70 years after the end of World War II and the closing of Auschwitz and the...

May 10, 2016

What Nazi Hunters Reveal About the Way We See History

Lily Rothman, Time

A new book goes inside a chapter of history that's about to end

As trials of former Nazis wend their way through the German legal system, ...

May 10, 2016

After the Nuremberg trials concluded and the Cold War began, most of the victors in World War II turned their attention elsewhere, too preoccupied to finish prosecuting Nazi war criminals. Lower-ranking Nazi officials blended in with the rest of Europe as people across the continent embarked...

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